Black History Month

black_history_month

Celebrate Black History Month in Chicago's Parks

The Chicago Park District hosts a number of events in parks across the city in celebration of Black History Month. 

Most programs are admission free or charge nominal fees.  Many activities are geared toward the entire family.  Please contact each individual park for additional information.

Following are a few highlights:

Kickoff Celebration of African American History Month
Saturday, Feb. 2; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Garfield Park Conservatory, 300 N. Central Park Ave.
Admission free, all ages
The Garfield Park Conservatory highlights plant and culture connections that celebrate important paths to memory and freedom.  Old traditions mingle with the new in this event that features song, dance, stories, plantings and a self-guided scavenger hunt.

Know Your Heritage
Thursday, Feb. 7; 6-7:30 p.m.
Austin Town Hall Cultural Center, 5610 W. Lake St., 773-287-7658
Admission $2, all ages
This celebration features performances by community members.

Black History Month Showcase
Friday, Feb. 22; 6:30-8:30 p.m.
LeClaire Park, 5120 W. 44th St., 312-747-6438
Admission free, all ages
Enjoy music and dance performances.

Umoja
Saturday, Feb. 23; 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Homan Square Park, 3559 W. Arthington St., 312-746-6650
Admission free, all ages
The event features African dance performances and poetry readings plus a vibrant marketplace featuring food, jewelry and clothing.

Ashaki
Friday, March 1; 6-9 p.m.
Washington Park, 5531 S. King Dr., 773-256-1248
Admission $3, all ages
Enjoy music, dance, food and vendors with African artifacts and displays.

 


 


Parks Named for African Americans
 

The Chicago Park District recognizes African Americans who have made important contributions to their communities and to the city at large by naming more than 40 parks in their honor.  

Chicago parks are named after such influential African Americans as Gwendolyn Brooks, George Washington Carver, Lorraine Hansberry, Mahalia Jackson, Dr. Martin Luther King, and Harold Washington.

Read more.