Huckleberry Park

  • 6200 S. Kimbark Ave.   Chicago, Illinois 60637 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Supervisor: Harriet Harris Park
  • Park Phone: (312) 747-7661

Located in the Woodlawn community, Huckleberry Park is an idyllic location for families to spend a portion of their day relaxing, enjoying nature and the outdoors. This park contains a soft- service playground with swings, slides, and climbing elements.

History

The Chicago Park District acquired this park site in 1969, officially naming it Huckleberry Park in 1974. The park was one of a number of properties named for trees and plants at this time. The huckleberry, or gaylussacia, is a small evergreen shrub. Some varieties of huckleberry are grown for their attractive flowers, others for their edible fruits. The plant's Latin name honors noted French chemist Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (1778-1850). Gay-Lussac's law concerning the volume of gases permitted the development of the food-canning industry. In his time, Gay-Lussac was also known for his hot air balloon experiments. In 1804, he ascended to 22,000 feet.

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

Huckleberry Playground

Huckleberry PlaygroundAccessible

Descriptors: Engineered Wood Fiber Surface

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Description

Located in the Woodlawn community, Huckleberry Park is an idyllic location for families to spend a portion of their day relaxing, enjoying nature and the outdoors. This park contains a soft- service playground with swings, slides, and climbing elements.

The Chicago Park District acquired this park site in 1969, officially naming it Huckleberry Park in 1974. The park was one of a number of properties named for trees and plants at this time. The huckleberry, or gaylussacia, is a small evergreen shrub. Some varieties of huckleberry are grown for their attractive flowers, others for their edible fruits. The plant's Latin name honors noted French chemist Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (1778-1850). Gay-Lussac's law concerning the volume of gases permitted the development of the food-canning industry. In his time, Gay-Lussac was also known for his hot air balloon experiments. In 1804, he ascended to 22,000 feet.

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.