Marlene Wesolek Park

  • 13401-11 S. Avenue M   Chicago, Illinois 60633 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Supervisor: Laura Casey
  • Park Phone: (773) 646-0210

Located in the Hegewisch community, Wesolek Playlot is an ideal location for families to spend a portion of their day relaxing and enjoying the outdoors. This park contains a playground with swings, slides, and climbing apparatus. Activities that are played at this location include soccer and hockey.

History

Marlene Wesolek Park is located on Avenue "M," one of a number of southeast side alphabet streets laid out by real estate subdivider Frank J. Lewis (1867-1960) around 1918. When an anticipated public transit line failed to materialize, Lewis' development dreams were deferred for nearly 40 years. Residential growth occurred in the area only after World War II. In 1949, the City of Chicago purchased the small site for park development. By the following year, the city's Department of Public Works was operating the property as a playlot. The city transferred the park to the Chicago Park District in 1959. In 2005, the park district renamed the site in honor of Marlene Wesolek as part of an initiative to recognize the achievements of significant Chicago women. Marlene Wesolek (1937–2001) was a community activist devoted to the Hegewisch community. She was an actively involved in CAPS Beat #433, and frequently helped organize and participated in anti-crime marches. She also dedicated her time to the Hegewisch Community Committee, a non-profit organization devoted to eliminating juvenile delinquency and providing educational, recreational and civic opportunities to the citizens of Southeast Chicago. She was particularly involved with the Hegewisch Community Committee’s efforts to involve children in after school programs. Marlene was a volunteer for Mann Park’s annual haunted house. She also contributed many hours to surveying the neighborhood for graffiti, inoperable streetlights, problematic buildings and other negative activity and working with the Alderman and City of Chicago to remedy these conditions.

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

Wesolek Playground

Wesolek PlaygroundAccessible

Descriptors: Engineered Wood Fiber Surface

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Description

Located in the Hegewisch community, Wesolek Playlot is an ideal location for families to spend a portion of their day relaxing and enjoying the outdoors. This park contains a playground with swings, slides, and climbing apparatus. Activities that are played at this location include soccer and hockey.

Marlene Wesolek Park is located on Avenue "M," one of a number of southeast side alphabet streets laid out by real estate subdivider Frank J. Lewis (1867-1960) around 1918. When an anticipated public transit line failed to materialize, Lewis' development dreams were deferred for nearly 40 years. Residential growth occurred in the area only after World War II. In 1949, the City of Chicago purchased the small site for park development. By the following year, the city's Department of Public Works was operating the property as a playlot. The city transferred the park to the Chicago Park District in 1959. In 2005, the park district renamed the site in honor of Marlene Wesolek as part of an initiative to recognize the achievements of significant Chicago women. Marlene Wesolek (1937–2001) was a community activist devoted to the Hegewisch community. She was an actively involved in CAPS Beat #433, and frequently helped organize and participated in anti-crime marches. She also dedicated her time to the Hegewisch Community Committee, a non-profit organization devoted to eliminating juvenile delinquency and providing educational, recreational and civic opportunities to the citizens of Southeast Chicago. She was particularly involved with the Hegewisch Community Committee’s efforts to involve children in after school programs. Marlene was a volunteer for Mann Park’s annual haunted house. She also contributed many hours to surveying the neighborhood for graffiti, inoperable streetlights, problematic buildings and other negative activity and working with the Alderman and City of Chicago to remedy these conditions.

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.