Mary Richardson Jones Park

  • 1240 S. Plymouth Ct.   Chicago, Illinois 60616 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Supervisor: Jackie Guthrie (Daley Bicentennial Park)
  • Park Phone: (312) 742-3918

This small playground is located in the Near South Community.   The park features a playground and is an active community park. 

While there is no structured programming taking place at this location, we invite you to check out our great programs offered at nearby Maggie Daley Park for recreation.  

History

In 1990, the Dearborn Park Corporation donated this park site in its ambitious residential development to the Chicago Park District. The park was officially named Indigo Bird in 1998 after the indigo bird, or indigo bunting, which was among the animals described as "common" in an 1850 catalogue of Chicago-area fauna. In 2005 as part of an effort by the Chicago Park District Board of Commissioners to recognize the contributions of Chicago women, the park was renamedMary Jane Richardson Jones Park. Jones (1819–1910) was an abolitionist and philanthropist who played an important role in Chicago’s Underground Railroad. The daughter of a free African American blacksmith, she married John Jones, the son of a freed slave. The couple the settled in Chicago in 1845, a time when there were only 140 African Americans residing in a city of 12,000. The Joneses’ played an important role in the Underground Railroad Movement, which helped runaway slaves from the south relocate to the north and Canada. Their own Near South Side home provided one of only two Underground Railroad terminals in the area. This was a risky endeavor because the laws at that time made harboring fugitive slaves punishable by a large fine and possible imprisonment for free Blacks. It is believed that the Joneses help hundreds of African Americans find safety. Mary Jones was also a suffragette, and leaders in the suffrage movement such as Susan B. Anthony, stayed in the Jones home when visiting Chicago.

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

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Description

This small playground is located in the Near South Community.   The park features a playground and is an active community park. 

While there is no structured programming taking place at this location, we invite you to check out our great programs offered at nearby Maggie Daley Park for recreation.  

In 1990, the Dearborn Park Corporation donated this park site in its ambitious residential development to the Chicago Park District. The park was officially named Indigo Bird in 1998 after the indigo bird, or indigo bunting, which was among the animals described as "common" in an 1850 catalogue of Chicago-area fauna. In 2005 as part of an effort by the Chicago Park District Board of Commissioners to recognize the contributions of Chicago women, the park was renamedMary Jane Richardson Jones Park. Jones (1819–1910) was an abolitionist and philanthropist who played an important role in Chicago’s Underground Railroad. The daughter of a free African American blacksmith, she married John Jones, the son of a freed slave. The couple the settled in Chicago in 1845, a time when there were only 140 African Americans residing in a city of 12,000. The Joneses’ played an important role in the Underground Railroad Movement, which helped runaway slaves from the south relocate to the north and Canada. Their own Near South Side home provided one of only two Underground Railroad terminals in the area. This was a risky endeavor because the laws at that time made harboring fugitive slaves punishable by a large fine and possible imprisonment for free Blacks. It is believed that the Joneses help hundreds of African Americans find safety. Mary Jones was also a suffragette, and leaders in the suffrage movement such as Susan B. Anthony, stayed in the Jones home when visiting Chicago.

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.