Sumac Park

  • 4201 S. Champlain Ave.   Chicago, Illinois 60653 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Supervisor: Christopher Zorich (Anderson Park)
  • Park Phone: (312) 742-6007

This small playlot, located in the Grand Boulevard Community is a popular communuity gathering place.  There is no structured programming offered at this location.

However, park fun can be had at nearby Anderson Park for afterschool programs and sports. 

History

The City of Chicago acquired this park property in 1958 and transferred it to the Chicago Park District the following year. Officially designated Sumac Park in 1973, the property was one of several parks named for trees and plants at this time. Fast-growing sumacs appear in the form of small trees, shrubs, and vines. Most of the more than 100 species of sumacs are found in southern Africa. At least two sumacs, the staghorn sumac and the poison sumac, may be found in the Chicagoland area. The staghorn sumac takes its name from its thick, wooly twigs, which in winter give the appearance of deer antlers in velvet. The oils of the poison sumac can cause serious rashes. Poison sumacs can be identified using the "black spot" test. The oil from a fresh leaf crushed on white paper will gradually turn the paper brown and then black within 24 hours.

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

Sumac Playlot

Sumac Playlot

Location Notes: 4201 S. Champlain Ave.

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Description

This small playlot, located in the Grand Boulevard Community is a popular communuity gathering place.  There is no structured programming offered at this location.

However, park fun can be had at nearby Anderson Park for afterschool programs and sports. 

The City of Chicago acquired this park property in 1958 and transferred it to the Chicago Park District the following year. Officially designated Sumac Park in 1973, the property was one of several parks named for trees and plants at this time. Fast-growing sumacs appear in the form of small trees, shrubs, and vines. Most of the more than 100 species of sumacs are found in southern Africa. At least two sumacs, the staghorn sumac and the poison sumac, may be found in the Chicagoland area. The staghorn sumac takes its name from its thick, wooly twigs, which in winter give the appearance of deer antlers in velvet. The oils of the poison sumac can cause serious rashes. Poison sumacs can be identified using the "black spot" test. The oil from a fresh leaf crushed on white paper will gradually turn the paper brown and then black within 24 hours.

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.