Green (Jeffrey S.) Park

  • 6500 N. Algonquin Ave.   Chicago, Illinois 60646 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Phone: (773) 631-7461

This park contains a playslab with a basketball standard and a playground with a sandbox. Neighbors had nicknamed the site Choo-Choo Park for the toy train that children play in. Slightly over an acre, this park is located in the Forest Glen neighborhood, one block northwest of Central Avenue, and 1 ½ blocks northeast of Caldwell Avenue (beyond the railroad tracks parallel to Lehigh Avenue).

While there is no structured programming taking place at this location, we invite you to check out our programs offered at nearby Edgebrook Park.

History

As automobiles became increasingly affordable to Chicago's middle class residents in the late 1920s, the northwest side's Forest Glen quickly developed as a commuter neighborhood. In 1939, the Board of Education built the new Edgebrook Elementary School to meet the educational needs of the booming community. Thirty years later, the Chicago Park District began leasing property surrounding the school. For more than a decade, the park district and the Board of Education jointly operated the school and adjacent ball fields and playground. The park district withdrew from the site in 1983. Only seven years later, however, joint operations were reinstituted after community residents approached the park district about developing school-based recreational programming for children, teenagers, and adults. The following year, the Board of Education transferred a five-acre section of the school property to the park district, but retained additional acreage for possible future library construction.

In the mid-1990s, the proposed library became a real possibility, Edgebrook resident and environmentalist Jeffrey S. Green (1938-1999) successfully prevented the potential loss of parkland by finding another location for the community library. In 2000, the park district recognized Green's efforts by naming the park in his honor. Green also left his mark on the city as a whole. A life-long environmental activist, Green was a founder and president of Friends of the Chicago River, an organization whose goal is to revitalize the river. He was also a board member of Friends of the Parks for over six years, and served as the organization's president. As a leader of both groups, Green worked diligently to improve Chicago's parks.

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

Green Playlot Playground

Green Playlot PlaygroundAccessible

Notes: Renovated Fall 2014, Chicago Plays! Renovation Program

Descriptors: Engineered Wood Fiber Surface

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Description

This park contains a playslab with a basketball standard and a playground with a sandbox. Neighbors had nicknamed the site Choo-Choo Park for the toy train that children play in. Slightly over an acre, this park is located in the Forest Glen neighborhood, one block northwest of Central Avenue, and 1 ½ blocks northeast of Caldwell Avenue (beyond the railroad tracks parallel to Lehigh Avenue).

While there is no structured programming taking place at this location, we invite you to check out our programs offered at nearby Edgebrook Park.

As automobiles became increasingly affordable to Chicago's middle class residents in the late 1920s, the northwest side's Forest Glen quickly developed as a commuter neighborhood. In 1939, the Board of Education built the new Edgebrook Elementary School to meet the educational needs of the booming community. Thirty years later, the Chicago Park District began leasing property surrounding the school. For more than a decade, the park district and the Board of Education jointly operated the school and adjacent ball fields and playground. The park district withdrew from the site in 1983. Only seven years later, however, joint operations were reinstituted after community residents approached the park district about developing school-based recreational programming for children, teenagers, and adults. The following year, the Board of Education transferred a five-acre section of the school property to the park district, but retained additional acreage for possible future library construction.

In the mid-1990s, the proposed library became a real possibility, Edgebrook resident and environmentalist Jeffrey S. Green (1938-1999) successfully prevented the potential loss of parkland by finding another location for the community library. In 2000, the park district recognized Green's efforts by naming the park in his honor. Green also left his mark on the city as a whole. A life-long environmental activist, Green was a founder and president of Friends of the Chicago River, an organization whose goal is to revitalize the river. He was also a board member of Friends of the Parks for over six years, and served as the organization's president. As a leader of both groups, Green worked diligently to improve Chicago's parks.

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.