Barberry Park

  • 2825 W. Arthington St.   Chicago, Illinois 60612 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Supervisor: Roy Ellis (Altgeld)
  • Park Phone: (312) 746-5001

This green space is located in the North Lawndale Community.  We invite you to check out our great programs offered at nearby Altgeld Park for recreation.

History

The Chicago Park District transformed this once-vacant lot to parkland in 1969, improving it with playground equipment, a sand box, and a spray pool. Officially designated Barberry Park in 1974, the park was one of a number of properties named for trees and plants at the time. An ornamental bush often used for hedges, the barberry has impressive vibrant fall foliage and long-lasting red berries that provide color throughout the winter. Historically, Arabs used the berries for sherbet, and probably knew the plant as berberys, meaning "shell," for its hollowed leaves. Barberries are also associated with the Berbers, who cultivated the them on Africa's Barbary Coast.Though the park district added playground equipment and planted some trees in 1975, the property now stands vacant. The future of the park is uncertain.

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

Barberry Sandbox

Barberry Sandbox

Location Notes: 2825 W. Arthington St.

Barberry Water Spray Feature

Barberry Water Spray Feature

Location Notes: 2825 W. Arthington St.

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Description

This green space is located in the North Lawndale Community.  We invite you to check out our great programs offered at nearby Altgeld Park for recreation.

The Chicago Park District transformed this once-vacant lot to parkland in 1969, improving it with playground equipment, a sand box, and a spray pool. Officially designated Barberry Park in 1974, the park was one of a number of properties named for trees and plants at the time. An ornamental bush often used for hedges, the barberry has impressive vibrant fall foliage and long-lasting red berries that provide color throughout the winter. Historically, Arabs used the berries for sherbet, and probably knew the plant as berberys, meaning "shell," for its hollowed leaves. Barberries are also associated with the Berbers, who cultivated the them on Africa's Barbary Coast.Though the park district added playground equipment and planted some trees in 1975, the property now stands vacant. The future of the park is uncertain.

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.