Cedar Playlot Park

  • 5311 N. Winthrop Ave.   Chicago, Illinois 60640 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Supervisor: Nick Bojko (Broadway Armory Park)
  • Park Phone: (312) 742-7502

Located in the Edgewater community this family destination recently received a facelift of sorts:a new playground! The new playground replaces a smaller, older playground, has soft surfacing and complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to be accessible to children with disabilities.

In addition to accessible, the new playground features colorful age appropriate action packed play areas with swings, slides, and climbing elements that keep children busy, soft surface tiles and rubber surfacing, new walkways, new fencing, improvements to existing spray pool, trash receptacles, new drinking fountain, benches, and new landscaping.

During the summer months children can create unique arts and crafts outdoors when the Chicago Park District drives its “Craftmobile” into Cedar Play. This touring four-wheeled wonder is filled with fun art projects and activities for children ages 6 and under. Art instructors will help kids create sidewalk murals, wax-resistant drawings, stained glass window hangings and more. And it’s free! All supplies are provided.

History

The City of Chicago acquired this property in 1958 and transferred it to the Chicago Park District the following year. Officially designated Cedar Park in 1973, the site was one of several parks named for trees and plants at this time. The term "cedar" is a vernacular name used for a group of unrelated conifers (cone-bearing trees) with fragrant wood. Cedars include several junipers and arborvitae. The northern white cedar grows widely in central and eastern Canada and the northeastern and midwestern United States. Brought to France in 1536, the northern white cedar was among the first North American plants to be introduced in Europe. The eastern red cedar, found in the United States as far west as the Dakotas, is used to line closets and chests because its smell repels moths. True cedars - as opposed to junipers and arbor vitae - are not native to North America.

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

Cedar Playground

Cedar PlaygroundAccessible

Location Notes: 5311 N. Winthrop Ave.

Cedar Water Spray Features

Cedar Water Spray Features

Location Notes: 5311 N. Winthrop Ave.

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Description

Located in the Edgewater community this family destination recently received a facelift of sorts:a new playground! The new playground replaces a smaller, older playground, has soft surfacing and complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to be accessible to children with disabilities.

In addition to accessible, the new playground features colorful age appropriate action packed play areas with swings, slides, and climbing elements that keep children busy, soft surface tiles and rubber surfacing, new walkways, new fencing, improvements to existing spray pool, trash receptacles, new drinking fountain, benches, and new landscaping.

During the summer months children can create unique arts and crafts outdoors when the Chicago Park District drives its “Craftmobile” into Cedar Play. This touring four-wheeled wonder is filled with fun art projects and activities for children ages 6 and under. Art instructors will help kids create sidewalk murals, wax-resistant drawings, stained glass window hangings and more. And it’s free! All supplies are provided.

The City of Chicago acquired this property in 1958 and transferred it to the Chicago Park District the following year. Officially designated Cedar Park in 1973, the site was one of several parks named for trees and plants at this time. The term "cedar" is a vernacular name used for a group of unrelated conifers (cone-bearing trees) with fragrant wood. Cedars include several junipers and arborvitae. The northern white cedar grows widely in central and eastern Canada and the northeastern and midwestern United States. Brought to France in 1536, the northern white cedar was among the first North American plants to be introduced in Europe. The eastern red cedar, found in the United States as far west as the Dakotas, is used to line closets and chests because its smell repels moths. True cedars - as opposed to junipers and arbor vitae - are not native to North America.

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.