Chamberlain Triangle Park

  • 4227 S. Greenwood Ave.   Chicago, Illinois 60653 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Supervisor: Renee Shepherd (Kennicott Park)
  • Park Phone: 312.747.7138

This small playground is located in the Kenwood Community.   The park features passive green space.  It is an active community park.

While there is no structured programming taking place at this location, we invite you to check out our great programs offered at nearby Kennicott Park for recreation.  

History

In 1888, real estate developers Miller and Chamberlain dedicated a triangle of land in their new Kenwood subdivision for use as a public park. In 1892, the Chicago City Council named the site Lakewood Point, combining the names of two adjacent streets, Lake Park Avenue and Greenwood Street. After 1908, the Special Park Commission planted numerous shrubs and flowers; constructed an iron fence around the property; and renamed it Chamberlain Triangle for the original developer. The Special Park Commission was disbanded in 1915, and Chamberlain Triangle passed to the Bureau of Parks and Recreation, which in turn transferred the greenspace to the Chicago Park District in 1959.

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

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Description

This small playground is located in the Kenwood Community.   The park features passive green space.  It is an active community park.

While there is no structured programming taking place at this location, we invite you to check out our great programs offered at nearby Kennicott Park for recreation.  

In 1888, real estate developers Miller and Chamberlain dedicated a triangle of land in their new Kenwood subdivision for use as a public park. In 1892, the Chicago City Council named the site Lakewood Point, combining the names of two adjacent streets, Lake Park Avenue and Greenwood Street. After 1908, the Special Park Commission planted numerous shrubs and flowers; constructed an iron fence around the property; and renamed it Chamberlain Triangle for the original developer. The Special Park Commission was disbanded in 1915, and Chamberlain Triangle passed to the Bureau of Parks and Recreation, which in turn transferred the greenspace to the Chicago Park District in 1959.

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.