Forest Glen Playlot Park

  • 5069 W. Berwyn Ave.   Chicago, Illinois 60630 [View Map]
  • Park Hours:
  • Park Supervisor: Carrie Morrisey (Gladstone Park)
  • Park Phone: (312) 742-7518

This small playground is located in the Forest Glen community (one block northeast of Elston Avenue and the Soo Line train tracks). In 1990, the Chicago Park District thoroughly rehabilitated the playground. While there is no structured programming taking place at this location, we invite you to check out our programs offered at nearby Gladstone Park.

History

Forest Glen Park takes its name from that of the surrounding community, largely composed of land once belonging to Billy Caldwell, the half-Indian, half-English chief of the Pottowattomis. Nicknamed "The Sauganash," meaning "The Englishman," Caldwell sold most of his land to farmers when his tribe was removed from the area in 1836. Though the territory was annexed to Chicago in 1899, it remained sparsely settled until the mid-1920s, when modern real estate development began. New Forest Glen residents soon sought to form their own park district to provide recreational facilities in their developing community, thereby enhancing the area and raising property values. After successfully preventing annexation by the neighboring Jefferson Park District, Forest Glen residents voted to create the independent Forest Glen Park District in 1929. The new park district created just one park. Early in 1933, the Forest Glen Park District purchased an irregularly-shaped, one-third-acre property soon known as Forest Glen Park. The park district immediately installed beautiful plantings and equipped the site with playground equipment. The district also commissioned architects to develop fieldhouse plans and secured a construction loan from the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works. In mid-1934, the Great Depression forced consolidation of the 22 independent park boards into the Chicago Park District. The newly-formed Chicago Park District decided not to pursue the fieldhouse plan, instead maintaining Forest Glen Park as a playground and greenspace. In

Parking/Directions

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.

Forest Glen Playground

Forest Glen PlaygroundAccessible

Location Notes: 5069 W. Berwyn Ave.

Documents

There are no documents available.

Photos & Videos

There are no photos or videos available.

Reviews

Description

This small playground is located in the Forest Glen community (one block northeast of Elston Avenue and the Soo Line train tracks). In 1990, the Chicago Park District thoroughly rehabilitated the playground. While there is no structured programming taking place at this location, we invite you to check out our programs offered at nearby Gladstone Park.

Forest Glen Park takes its name from that of the surrounding community, largely composed of land once belonging to Billy Caldwell, the half-Indian, half-English chief of the Pottowattomis. Nicknamed "The Sauganash," meaning "The Englishman," Caldwell sold most of his land to farmers when his tribe was removed from the area in 1836. Though the territory was annexed to Chicago in 1899, it remained sparsely settled until the mid-1920s, when modern real estate development began. New Forest Glen residents soon sought to form their own park district to provide recreational facilities in their developing community, thereby enhancing the area and raising property values. After successfully preventing annexation by the neighboring Jefferson Park District, Forest Glen residents voted to create the independent Forest Glen Park District in 1929. The new park district created just one park. Early in 1933, the Forest Glen Park District purchased an irregularly-shaped, one-third-acre property soon known as Forest Glen Park. The park district immediately installed beautiful plantings and equipped the site with playground equipment. The district also commissioned architects to develop fieldhouse plans and secured a construction loan from the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works. In mid-1934, the Great Depression forced consolidation of the 22 independent park boards into the Chicago Park District. The newly-formed Chicago Park District decided not to pursue the fieldhouse plan, instead maintaining Forest Glen Park as a playground and greenspace. In

For directions using public transportation visit www.transitchicago.com.